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§ 4-215. Child(ren)’s health insurance, nonreimbursed health care expenses, and cash medical support in Title IV-D cases.

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   As required by Neb. Rev. Stat. § 42-369(2), the child support order shall address how the parents will provide for the child(ren)’s health care needs through health insurance as well as the nonreimbursed reasonable and necessary child(ren)’s health care costs that are not included in table 1 that are provided for in § 4-215(B).

   (A) Health Insurance. The increased cost to the parent for health insurance for the child(ren) of the parent shall be prorated between the parents. When worksheet 1 is used, it shall be added to the monthly support from line 7, then prorated between the parents to arrive at each party’s share of monthly support on line 10 of worksheet 1. The parent requesting an adjustment for health insurance premiums must submit proof of the cost for health insurance coverage of the child(ren). The parent paying the premium receives a credit against his or her share of the monthly support. If not otherwise specified in the support order, “health insurance” includes coverage for medical, dental, orthodontic, optometric, substance abuse, and mental health treatment.

   (B) Health Care. Children’s health care expenses are specifically included in the guidelines amount of up to $480 per child per year. Children's health care needs are to be met by requiring either parent to provide health insurance as required by state law. All nonreimbursed reasonable and necessary children's health care costs in excess of $480 per child per year shall be allocated to the obligor parent as determined by the court, but shall not exceed the proportion of the obligor’s parental contribution (worksheet 1, line 6). If not otherwise specified in the support order, “health care costs” includes coverage for medical, dental, orthodontic, optometric, substance abuse, and mental health treatment.

   (C) Cash Medical Support and Health Care Costs for Title IV-D Cases Only.

   (i) All child support orders in the Title IV-D program must address how the parties will provide for the child(ren)’s health care needs through health care coverage and/or through cash medical support. Cash medical support or the cost of private health insurance is considered reasonable in cost if the cost to the party responsible for providing medical support for the child(ren) does not exceed 3 percent of his or her gross income. In applying the 3-percent standard, the cost is the cost of adding the child(ren) to existing health care coverage or the difference between self-only and family health care coverage. Cash medical support payment shall not be ordered if, at the time that the order is issued or modified, the responsible party’s income is, or such expense would reduce the responsible party’s net income, below the basic subsistence limitation provided in § 4-218. If a court orders a parent to pay cash medical support, it shall be in lieu of, and not in addition to, requiring the parent to also pay reimbursement for reasonable and necessary children's health care costs as set forth in § 4-215(B).

   (ii) The amount of cash medical support ordered in the case shall be prorated between the parents. When worksheet 1 is used, it shall be added to the monthly support from line 7, then prorated between the parents to arrive at each party’s share of monthly support on line 10 of worksheet 1. The parent paying the cash medical support receives a credit against his or her share of the monthly support.

Paragraph O amended effective Jan. 1, 1996; amended effective Sept. 1, 2002; amended Nov. 26, 2003, effective Jan. 1, 2004; amended effective July 1, 2007. Renumbered and codified as § 4‑215, effective July 18, 2008; § 4-215 amended Sept. 16, 2009; § 4-215(C) adopted Sept. 16, 2009, effective Sept. 30, 2009; § 4-215 (all sections) amended July 13, 2011, effective September 1, 2011.

This page was last modified on Wednesday, October 10, 2012